Select Page
SCAS Chief Executive joins the ultimate challenge to raise money for the ambulance staff charity

SCAS Chief Executive joins the ultimate challenge to raise money for the ambulance staff charity

SCAS Chief Executive, Will Hancock, has joined forces with colleagues from the College of Paramedics, Association of Ambulance Chief Executives and East Midlands Ambulance Service to raise money for The Ambulance Staff Charity.

Will Hancock Chief Executive SCAS

Completing the fastest zipline in the world and climbing Mount Snowdon at night might not be everyone’s idea of fun, but for Anna Parry, Kerry Gulliver, Tracy Nicholls and Will Hancock, they are hoping there will be plenty of laughs along the way when they take part in the tough Ultimate Fundraising Challenge to raise money for The Ambulance Service Charity – TASC – on 17 July, 2021.

Will, has been joined by Anna, who is the Deputy Managing Director of the Association of Ambulance Chief Executives (AACE), Kerry, the Director of Human Resources and Organisational Development at East Midlands Ambulance Service, and Tracy, the CEO of the College of Paramedics, and they have decided to team up to raise £5,000 for TASC which helps care for the mental, physical and financial wellbeing of the UK’s ambulance community.

Tracey said: “When I came up with this challenge it honestly seemed like a good idea in my head but now that it’s just over three months away the thought of the zip wire is absolutely terrifying me. It doesn’t help that my fitness isn’t the best. I walk my dogs a couple of miles a day but I’m really going to have to do more than that if I have any hope of completing this challenge. That’s why I’m keen to hear from any kind ambulance folk who can give me any good tips or advice on how best to train.”

She added: “To say this challenge is outside the norm for me is an understatement but I’m determined to see it through and raise as much money as we can. I have been a lifelong member of the ambulance family and have lost friends and colleagues during the pandemic. But more than that, there seems to be literally nowhere else for our profession to go when they need help, except for TASC. How can you do a job like this, at a time like this, and not be affected? TASC do an amazing job at helping but I know how fragile funding streams can be so anything we can do to assist is important.”

On 17 July, the foursome will step out of their comfort zones to take on Velocity, the fastest zipline in the world. Travelling at speeds of over 100mph, this adrenalin-inducing challenge has been described as the ‘nearest thing to flying’ as participants soar over Penrhyn Quarry and get to experience spectacular views of the North Wales coastline and beyond.

But the excitement doesn’t end there. Later that evening, they will be lacing up their walking boots, turning on their torches and trekking up 3560ft to the top of Mount Snowdon – the highest mountain in England and Wales – in a bid to raise much-needed funds for TASC.

Anna Parry said: “I’ve actually climbed Snowdonia before but in daylight. For me, the toughest part of this challenge is going to be facing my fear – the zip wire. The closest I’ve ever come to anything like this is when I did a tandem sky-dive in Australia in my 20s which I loved….until my parachute failed to open. Fortunately, the reserve did!

“I’m hoping the zipline won’t be so nerve-wracking, but even if it is I knew I had to be involved in this challenge because ambulance service staff have done such a tremendous job over the last 12 months, as they always do. This is an opportunity to give a little back and support TASC in the great work they do for the sector, alongside trusts, in ensuring staff are able to access the mental health and wellbeing resources they might need.”

Will Hancock agrees. He explained: “This ticks a lot of boxes for me – a charity doing hugely important work at a time when it has never been more essential. And personally speaking, I want to encourage everyone in the ambulance sector to ask for help if they need it. We know it is the hardest step yet it is the most important. It is vital to look after people who need help and who have committed themselves to helping others.”

Kerry Gulliver says she wholeheartedly supports the work of TASC and jumped at the chance to take part in the fundraising challenge when asked. She said: “Our staff in the ambulance service do a difficult job, often under very challenging circumstances, providing care for patients when they need it most. This can have an impact on their mental health and wellbeing, which is why it is so important that we focus on doing whatever we can do to ensure that our ambulance staff can access the relevant support when they need it. TASC play a vital role in caring for the mental health and wellbeing of ambulance staff and their families, and that’s why I’m taking part in this challenge.”

As someone who has been helped enormously by TASC, ambulance technician Wayne Thomson, is delighted that the charity will benefit from the Ultimate Fundraising Challenge. He said: “Without TASC’s help I would still be suffering with my PTSD and on medication to control my moods. My family and I are so grateful to TASC, we can’t thank them enough. Helps is there, don’t suffer in silence; just ask.”

To show your support for Anna, Kerry, Tracy and Will, you can donate via their JustGiving page at https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/tracy-anna-will-kerry

Ends

About South Central Ambulance Service

  • South Central Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust (SCAS) provides a range of emergency, urgent care and non-emergency healthcare services, along with commercial logistics services, to the populations of the South Central region – Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Hampshire and Oxfordshire – as well as non-emergency patient transport services In Surrey and Sussex, and a dental service (accessed via NHS 111) in parts of Dorset.
  • SCAS now serves a population of more than seven million people and employs more than 4,000 staff who, together with 965 volunteer community and co-responders, enable the organisation to attend more than 555,000 incidents via 999, handle 1.24 million calls to NHS 111 and make 866,000 patient transport service journeys each year.
  • SCAS is a foundation trust, which means it has thousands of members and a Council of Governors which form an integral part of the governance structure of the Trust. Being a foundation trust means there are more opportunities for patients and their families, staff and local residents to play a part in the future of the organisation. Find out more here: scas.nhs.uk/get-involved/
  • South Central Ambulance Charity raises funds to support SCAS. All the money raised by the charity is used to enhance services, projects and equipment across the Trust. The Charity works across Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Hampshire and Oxfordshire as well as supporting patient transport services In Surrey and Sussex. Find out more here: charity

About TASC

The Ambulance Staff Charity is the leading UK charity working to support the mental, physical and financial wellbeing of current and retired ambulance staff, their family members, ambulance service volunteers and paramedic science students. TASC understands the challenges facing all members of the ambulance services and offers psychological rehabilitation and counselling, a stress and PTSD programme, physical rehabilitation, financial grant, bereavement and other welfare support. For further information please go to www.theasc.org.uk

About the College of Paramedics

The College of Paramedics is the professional body for all paramedics in the UK, whose role is to promote and develop the paramedic profession across England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. Membership is open to all UK paramedics, student paramedics and anyone with an interest in the paramedic profession and healthcare delivery. All members have access to a wide variety of learning resources which provide high quality continuing professional development (CPD) across a range of platforms and also at many events held around the UK. For further information please go to www.collegeofparamedics.co.uk

About AACE

The Association of Ambulance Chief Executives (AACE) provides ambulance services with a central organisation that supports , co-ordinates and implements nationally agreed policy. It also provides the general public and other stakeholders with a central resource of information about NHS ambulance services. Whether for patient care, operational policy or emergency preparedness, the Association exists to support its members and to act as the interface between them and their stakeholders. It provides a structure to co-ordinate, manage and implement key national work programmes and policy and the development of patient care. For further information please go to https://aace.org.uk/

South Central Ambulance Charity receives £410k funding boost to deliver pioneering training programmes

South Central Ambulance Charity receives £410k funding boost to deliver pioneering training programmes

SCA CharitySouth Central Ambulance Charity has been allocated £410k by NHS Charities Together to help support a number of innovative projects across South Central Ambulance Service (SCAS).

These include pioneering training programmes for Community First Responders (CFRs) and care home staff, as well as 17 new LUCAS 3 mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) devices.

The funding forms part of a wider £7 million investment by NHS Charities Together in ambulance services across the UK announced today.

It means South Central Ambulance Charity can embark on a project that will see SCAS become the first ambulance trust in the UK to train an enhanced group of CFRs to perform diagnostic tests including electrocardiograms (ECGs) and urinalysis to support accurate and early diagnosis.

CFRs are members of the public trained to support the ambulance service primarily by responding to medical emergencies and sometimes providing lifesaving first aid to patients before paramedics arrive.

They also assist with ongoing patient care at the scene and attend more than 30,000 incidents every year. They are funded solely by South Central Ambulance Charity, which provides equipment, training and is responsible for the vehicle fleet.

Community First Responders with lifting cushions

Community First Responders with lifting cushions

There are currently more than 1,200 CFRs and Co-Responders – these are members of the fire service, police, coastguard and military who volunteer in their spare time – at SCAS covering Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Hampshire and Oxfordshire.

They undertake an initial five-day training programme, six-monthly refresher programme and commit to at least 20 hours a month, usually covering a five-mile radius from their home or workplace.

These additional skills will enable enhanced CFRs to provide more detailed information on patients’ conditions earlier and help SCAS clinicians decide on the most appropriate care pathway for them, whether in hospital or onward referral within the community.

In addition to this project, the funding will enable SCAS to provide support, training and equipment for care home staff to enable them to better assess when an ambulance response may be required.

LUCAS CPR devices deliver continuous, safe and effective chest compressions which maintain blood circulation at a regular level while freeing up paramedics to focus on other critical aspects of care while a patient is transferred in an ambulance. The purchase of the new LUCAS 3 models will mean the Trust can upgrade from its current LUCAS 2 equipment.

South Central Ambulance Charity will also use the cash injection to provide emergency lifting cushions to CFRs to enable early assistance to patients who have experienced non-injury falls and support the implementation of GoodSAM, an app which automatically triggers alerts to nearby cardiac arrests to whoever is signed on.

LUCAS 3 CPR device

LUCAS 3 CPR device

This means they can attend and provide immediate life support while an ambulance is en route and the app identifies the location of the nearest defibrillator. The funds will also support widespread training in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

“We are delighted to have secured this grant for the charity which has been awarded thanks to the exceptional support from the public and NHS Charities Together. It will enable us to increase the support we are able to give to our CFRs through life-saving equipment and further training to develop the programme, as well as supporting our staff with important equipment such as LUCAS devices,” said Vanessa Casey, Chief Executive of South Central Ambulance Charity.

Nicola Dunbar, Head of Community Engagement and Training at SCAS, said: “These funds will go towards some really exciting developments across SCAS including our pioneering projects to train an enhanced group of CFRs to carry out additional diagnostic tests and to support, train and equip care home staff to respond to the health needs of their residents so they can better understand when an ambulance response would be required.”

Dr John Black, Medical Director at SCAS, said: “We are extremely pleased to benefit from this generous national funding as it will enable us to further develop a number of areas of work across SCAS to enhance patient care and ensure our CFRs are among the most advanced in the country.

“It will also help with the addition of more advanced LUCAS 3 devices which can provide high quality chest compressions to patients in need of prolonged resuscitation while freeing up paramedics to carry out other essential patient care during a transfer to hospital.”

Ellie Orton, Chief Executive of NHS Charities Together, added: “At this time of immense challenge for the NHS we are delighted that we can make a real difference and ultimately help save lives by funding amazing CFR volunteers and additional support for South Central Ambulance Service.”

Can you outrun an ambulance?

Can you outrun an ambulance?

The South Central Ambulance Service (SCAS) Charity is urging people to ‘go the extra mile’ and take part in a virtual event to see if they can complete a challenge to cover more miles than an emergency ambulance does in a single shift.

The virtual challenge, which launched on 1 March and runs until the end of May, hopes to raise a total of £10,000 which will give vital extra funds to the SCAS Charity’s work.

Laura and Will standing next to an ambulance

How to take part

The SCAS Charity has identified the approximate mileage an ambulance will drive on a typical operational shift from each of the Trust’s ambulance stations in Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Hampshire and Oxfordshire.

Berkshire

Wexham (75 miles), Newbury (140), Bracknell (155), Reading (165)

Buckinghamshire

Stoke Mandeville (94), High Wycombe (164), Milton Keynes (186)

Hampshire

North Harbour (66), Nursling (70), Hythe (81), Eastleigh (95), Hightown (109), Ringwood (110), Petersfield (117), Lymington (129)

Oxfordshire

Oxford (98), Kidlington (108), Adderbury (133), Didcot (152)

Participants simply choose their ambulance from the above list and over the course of three months (1 March-31 May) try to clock up at least one more mile than the approximate mileage. This can be done running, walking, cycling or other form of exercise.

Funds can be raised by setting up a fundraising page online at:

www.justgiving.com/campaign/scasoutrunanambulance

or:

www.virginmoneygiving.com/fund/scasoutrunanambulance

Remember to share your journey with the SCAS Charity with #Icanoutrunanambulance and #scas and tag the Charity on Facebook (@SCAS.Charity), Twitter (@scacharity) and Instagram (@scasambulancecharity)

Laura Patrick, Communications and Fundraising Officer at the SCAS Charity, said:

“We wanted to create a challenge that was accessible to as many people as possible, hence the wide range in mileage options on our list of stations. You can add miles with any form of exercise – go out for a run, a cycle, a walk, or indoors on an exercise bike, treadmill or rowing machine. We’ve even got one lady attempting to out swim an ambulance! You can take part as an individual or team up with people in your household or support bubble.”

Will Hancock, Chief Executive at South Central Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust, said:

“I fully support this latest fundraising campaign from our wonderful Charity team. With so many fundraising events cancelled over the last 12 months any money that you can raise during this challenge will make a real difference to our Charity and enable us to save more lives. It costs £310.00 a year to keep our volunteer community first responders active in their local communities, and we have over 1,000 CFRs across the four counties we serve. They are sent to life-threatening emergencies and other priority emergency calls in their local area. Last year they were sent to over 24,000 incidents but we can only keep them trained, equipped and operational with funds raised by the SCAS Charity.”

For more information about the SCAS Charity visit https://scas.charity

Ends

About South Central Ambulance Service

  1. South Central Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust (SCAS) provides a range of emergency, urgent care and non-emergency healthcare services, along with commercial logistics services, to the populations of the South Central region – Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Hampshire and Oxfordshire – as well as non-emergency patient transport services In Surrey and Sussex, and a dental service (accessed via NHS 111) in parts of Dorset.
  2. SCAS now serves a population of more than seven million people and employs more than 4,000 staff who, together with 965 volunteer community and co-responders, enable the organisation to attend more than 555,000 incidents via 999, handle 1.24 million calls to NHS 111 and make 866,000 patient transport service journeys each year.
  3. SCAS is a foundation trust, which means it has thousands of members and a Council of Governors which form an integral part of the governance structure of the Trust. Being a foundation trust means there are more opportunities for patients and their families, staff and local residents to play a part in the future of the organisation. Find out more here: www.scas.nhs.uk/get-involved/
  4. South Central Ambulance Charity raises funds to support SCAS. All the money raised by the charity is used to enhance services, projects and equipment across the Trust. The Charity works across Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Hampshire and Oxfordshire as well as supporting patient transport services In Surrey and Sussex. Find out more here: scas.charity
Paramedics turn written-off ambulance into innovative training simulation pod

Paramedics turn written-off ambulance into innovative training simulation pod

Back of an ambulance training podParamedics at South Central Ambulance Service (SCAS) have given life-saving treatment to an ambulance which was written off after a road traffic collision – by using it to create an innovative training pod.

The SCAS education team in Newbury had the body of the vehicle repaired to repurpose it as a training simulator and provide the opportunity for students to learn in the real thing.

It weighs 4.5 tonnes before the addition of kit and includes all the essentials – as well as a working tail lift and even a power line to flick on the blue lights and sirens to add to the experience.

It is the latest addition to the family of simulators at the SCAS Education and Enhanced Simulation Centre, a facility that includes six purpose-built training and environment rooms that recreate patients’ journeys from home, into to a mobile simulated ambulance and then at handover to a hospital’s emergency department resuscitation bay.

“What we really love about the introduction of this simulation pod is that its authenticity will give students a much more enhanced and lifelike insight into the workings of the vehicle and its kit,” said Darren Best, Senior Education Manager at SCAS.

Inside the ambulance training pod“The ambulance converted was unfortunately involved in a serious road traffic collision and was not fit to return to the road, so not only have we avoided losing a vehicle from the fleet, we are now in the fortunate position of using this one to train a new generation of staff.”

He added: “While there are many simulators around, many of these are purpose-built as opposed to developed from real vehicles and are therefore limited in their ability to provide a real-life training environment.

“We believe this is the first pod of its kind having been salvaged from the scrapheap and able to provide the most realistic experience of any simulator – so we are extremely pleased with the outcome.

“We’ve even had a label added to the side to say it is probably the best ambulance pod in the country – we think it is!”

Click here for a guided tour video with SCAS Education’s Karen Wootten.

SCAS tests patients for COVID-19 before transfer to hospital in pioneering study

SCAS tests patients for COVID-19 before transfer to hospital in pioneering study

Paramedics at South Central Ambulance Service (SCAS) are testing patients for COVID-19 at home – including those without symptoms – if they require transfer to hospital in a pioneering initiative designed to speed up handovers and release crews more quickly.

Currently, lateral flow tests, which are used to detect the virus in people with no symptoms who could be highly infectious, are only used when patients being transferred by ambulance without confirmed COVID-19 arrive at hospital in locations such as emergency departments and maternity assessment units.

The test involves placing a swab in the nose and/or mouth which is then mixed with a solution that looks for virus fragments. Droplets are then placed onto the device and a result is delivered within 30 minutes.

The pilot study will see lateral flow tests administered by a trained ambulance crew to patients on the decision to transfer them to hospital, with the trial involving all patients over 18 – both with or without symptoms – who are being taken to Oxford University Hospitals.

The process will ensure a patient has test results on or very soon after arrival to inform secondary care clinicians which COVID-19 care pathway should be followed.

“The pandemic saw hospitals quickly arrange separate pathways for receiving patients, with red/COVID-19 for patients reporting symptoms and with suspected or confirmed infection, and green/non-COVID for patients not reporting symptoms and without suspected or confirmed infection,” said Dr John Black, Medical Director at SCAS.

“When these tests are carried out on arrival at hospital, social distancing requirements and the wait for results may contribute to ambulance handover delays and a bottleneck in patient flow through the care pathways.

“We expect the use of lateral flow tests pre-hospital to have a direct and positive impact on reducing handover delays, improving bottleneck of patients in the red/COVID care pathway queue and increase patient hospital flow.”

He added: “This is a small study to begin with in Oxford, so it will not happen with every patient transfer across SCAS, however, further roll out to a wider area will be considered if the concept is proved through the pilot and there is sufficient access to lateral flow devices.”

New apprenticeship promises paramedic career to more people

New apprenticeship promises paramedic career to more people

Despite the ongoing challenges posed by COVID-19, seven English ambulance trusts and one university have persisted in their vision to offer the first paramedic apprenticeship across England.

The BSc (Hons) Paramedic (Apprenticeship) Degree was devised by the University of Cumbria and will take just two years to complete, compared to three for a traditional degree in paramedic science.

The new apprenticeship programme will teach around 1000 paramedics over the first two years, significantly increasing the national paramedic workforce.

Seven out of 11 English ambulance service trusts have signed up so far: South Central Ambulance Service (SCAS), Isle of Wight Ambulance Service, South Western Ambulance Service Trust (SWAST), South East Coast Ambulance Service, London Ambulance Service, North West Ambulance Service and East of England Ambulance Service.

The programme is open to existing ambulance service staff serving in patient-facing roles such as emergency care assistants, ambulance technicians and associate ambulance practitioners to develop their careers and become fully-qualified paramedics.

This means the highly respected profession will be open to people to continue to work on the front line while gaining a full BSc (Hons) in Paramedic Practice, allowing each ambulance service to develop its own staff and grow its own workforce.

Originally the intention was to offer recruits blended learning to allow them to continue their normal frontline roles while studying. This would involve a mixture of classroom and online learning, practical sessions, tutorials and non-ambulance placements.

Owing to the constrictions of COVID-19, some trusts are now inducting their cohorts in a staggered fashion over spring to ensure the safety of apprentices and support the continued operation of the vital emergency service they offer.

SCAS was the first trust to induct a cohort last October, with a second to follow on 8 February along with SWAST’s first cohort, which coincides with national apprenticeship week.

Due to the pandemic, the first ten days of teaching will all be online. This change was made practically overnight responding to the national lockdown announced in early January.

Tom Davidson, Director at Centre for Excellence in Paramedic Practice at the University of Cumbria said the quick turnaround was testament to the flexibility of the course.

Tom standing in a training room

“We’ve designed this apprenticeship so that it can react and flex to meet the needs of the ambulance trusts and this approach was put to the test recently when we converted the initial first few weeks’ training to be delivered fully online in response to safety concerns.

“But it’s a testament to everyone’s commitment that we could easily adapt the course and that we kept going despite the challenging and turbulent times we are operating in.”

He added that the scale of the apprenticeship will have a lasting impact on the nation’s paramedic workforce.

We’re proud that this course supports any learner to realise their ambition to become a paramedic no matter their background or previous academic achievement and that we are helping the ambulance service to grow and retain a highly skilled workforce.”

The programme has been developed over the last two years, beginning before the pandemic hit. Ian Teague, Assistant Director of Education at SCAS, was one of the instigators of the apprenticeship and is a representative of the alliance of southern-based ambulance service trusts.

Close up photo of Ian

He said: “South Central Ambulance Service is committed to the professional development of its staff and for many years we have provided programmes of education in partnership with universities to develop staff to become UK registered paramedics.

“The Paramedic Science (Apprenticeship) Degree is arguably one of the most exciting and innovative educational developments to be introduced into the profession and will secure the continued development of our own frontline operational staff to become registered paramedics, backed by a BSc (Hons) degree.

“We are incredibly proud to have been the first ambulance service in the country to have started this new degree programme with our partners at the University of Cumbria and it has proven to be a popular career development route for those frontline members of our teams who want to combine studying whilst working as they develop their ambulance service career with SCAS. With one cohort of 23 students already enrolled in the degree programme in October last year, a second cohort will commence their studies during Apprenticeship Week.”

Ellis standing next to an ambulance

Ellis Mead is an emergency care assistant (ECA) for SCAS based at Oxford and is one of the new apprentices starting on 8 February.

Ellis recently featured on ‘Inside the Ambulance’, a programme on the W Channel that follows ambulance crews from the South Central Ambulance Service in Portsmouth and Oxford as they carry out their duties.

Having grown up in the French Pyrenees, Ellis and his family moved back to the UK when he was 15-years-old. He dropped down a school year voluntarily to help him learn and improve his, at that time, very limited English, but understandably struggled and failed both his English and Maths GCSEs. He subsequently went to college and passed a public services course with a triple distinction.

“I had a variety of different jobs after college and it was working as a special constable, that I became interested in the ambulance service – having worked alongside them at incidents – and applied for an emergency care assistant role at SCAS”, says Ellis.

“Having researched the career opportunities before joining, it was always my intention to become a paramedic. Whilst working for SCAS I took evening classes and passed my Maths and English GCSEs as a first step, but I couldn’t afford a full-time external degree course, nor did I have the science qualification necessary to apply either.

“The Paramedic Science (Apprenticeship) Degree with University of Cumbria required two years’ experience as an ECA – which I have – and I had to complete a portfolio of work to be accepted. To have the opportunity to study whilst continuing to work means I can support my family and pay my bills – it’s perfect for me.”

SCAS second cohort and SWAST’s first cohort of apprentices begin on 8 February. London and the North West, South East Coast, East of England and Isle of Wight start their apprentices in March and April.

The university’s Centre of Excellence in Paramedic Practice is the principal provider for paramedic education in the UK. Based at The University of Cumbria it has over 1000 students currently studying on a mixture of both degree and professional qualifications.

Ends

About South Central Ambulance Service

  1. South Central Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust (SCAS) provides a range of emergency, urgent care and non-emergency healthcare services, along with commercial logistics services, to the populations of the South Central region – Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Hampshire and Oxfordshire – as well as non-emergency patient transport services In Surrey and Sussex, and a dental service (accessed via NHS 111) in parts of Dorset.
  2. SCAS now serves a population of more than seven million people and employs more than 4,000 staff who, together with 965 volunteer community and co-responders, enable the organisation to attend more than 555,000 incidents via 999, handle 1.24 million calls to NHS 111 and make 866,000 patient transport service journeys each year.
  3. SCAS is a foundation trust, which means it has thousands of members and a Council of Governors which form an integral part of the governance structure of the Trust. Being a foundation trust means there are more opportunities for patients and their families, staff and local residents to play a part in the future of the organisation. Find out more here: www.scas.nhs.uk/get-involved/
  4. South Central Ambulance Charity raises funds to support SCAS. All the money raised by the charity is used to enhance services, projects and equipment across the Trust. The Charity works across Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Hampshire and Oxfordshire as well as supporting patient transport services In Surrey and Sussex. Find out more here: scas.charity